Brexit: The establishment that changed me from remain, to leave

When the referendum came up in 2016, I took a long deep think about it, and researched thoroughly the pro’s and con’s each side. Long story short, I voted to remain, as it gives us and the next generation much more options in the future.

Brexit01

When the result was announced that the decision was to leave, it sent shockwaves through not only the UK, but the whole of Europe and beyond. The whole world was talking about it. But the EU establishment itself was particularly shocked. Nigel Farage famously stood up in front of them all and said “When I came here 17 years ago, and said I was going to start a campaign to get Britain to leave the EU, you all laughed at me, well you’re not laughing now are you”.

I was still a remainer at this point, but as the months went along, the true colours of the EU were coming out and making me doubt if this establishment is worth doing business with.

If we first put it into context, the EU has 28 members, and wants it to become a united states of Europe, with one currency, one army, one flag and an anthem. It has a strong grip of the union and it’s members. This referendum result sent shockwaves through the EU, and they instantly became determined to either overturn the result, or make it as difficult as possible to at least make sure none of the other members think about leaving. These are the events that happened in the months after the result:

  • The EU plucked a “divorce bill” of £52bn, out of the air
  • This was later revised to £40bn
  • Then, it said Spain was allowed to Veto any Brexit proposal, if it was not happy with a “solution” on Gibraltar (but Google Melilla and Ceuta – Hypocrites of Spain)
  • Guy Verhofstadt claimed that the EU masterminded the Good Friday agreement (they had nothing to do with it)
  • Catalonia in Spain, voters tried to place their votes – the police, including riot police shut down 92 polling stations and injure 750 voters. The EU turns a blind eye
  • It states the UK is “not allowed” to discuss or negotiate any trade deals until there is a final conclusion on brexit
  • It is looking to punish Hungary and Poland for not accepting any migrants, yet is not doing anything about the migrant crisis itself – i.e. the ships such as the Aquarius sitting 12 miles off Libya and providing a taxi service for migrants to Europe
  • Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission President, said “English is losing it’s importance” and was choosing French instead

It’s funny how English only starts “losing it’s importance” when the country that hosts the founder of the language, England, wants to leave their club. And this coming from a guy from Luxembourg. A guy with Luxembourgish as his native language, has no place to criticise English, the international language of business, commerce and travel. Most airports in the entire world, have signs in their local language, and English. In fact, if you look at the map below, it shows you what languages each country believe is the most useful, after their own native tongue. Blue indicates English, Red indicates French. Now, the UK and Ireland put French because the native language is English. So, the whole continent believes English is the most useful language, apart from that little red Enclave there in the middle – yes – that’s LUXEMBOURG!

most-useful-languages

This week Theresa May went to Salzburg to meet with the EU about her Chequers plan. They basically said “it will not work” and did not offer up any counter proposals. In other words, “UK, go back and try again”. It reminded me of when the EU ignored French and Dutch voters who said no to the EU constitution, and when Ireland voted against the Lisbon treaty and the EU made Ireland vote again and again until they got it “right”

ireland lisbon

Or when it bullied Greece, Portugal, Ireland, Spain and others with financial bailouts, much of which were their own doing. The Euro for example, has NOT seen prosperity across Europe, particularly the Mediterranean countries. I saw it myself in Portugal several years ago. Greece should never have joined the EU or Euro because of its financial position, it faked its books and the EU knew it, but this was ignored to help the EU build its empire.

There are a whole host of other things I have learnt about this EU establishment over the past two years, and I have to say, I don’t like them much. These un-elected, overpaid old men in Brussels, are making rules that affect our lives.

There are a lot of benefits to being in the EU, no doubt. We can travel and work all across Europe freely, which I have done. We have no phone roaming charges anymore, our business can trade freely with little documentation and no tariffs. Collectively we can work together against possible enemies such as Russia which is on our doorstep.

However, is this really the be all and end all for our country being a success? I think not. We are the 5 richest nation on earth, the EU is only 15% of the global GDP. There is a whole world out there, and we have neglected our friends and family in the commonwealth of which we have centuries of history.

Secondly, this EU “project” as I will call it, I do not believe will work long term. The countries of Europe are thousands of years old, they all have different languages, cultures, traditions, and until the Euro, different currencies. Trying to combine them into a US of Europe, will not work. All countries in Europe, are allied anyway, we are all friends now, so even when the UK leaves the EU, if Russia were to attack Poland for example, we would be right there to defend our neighbours and friends. We don’t need an EU for that.

Brexit03.jpg

Look at the above map, it’s a big club, but with us leaving is going to leave a big gap. I voted remain, but because of my bulletpoints up above, I am now quite happy to leave, and I don’t want this Theresa half in half out rubbish, a clean slate, leave, and start again. We managed Millennia on our own, let’s go and start again, but remain close friends and allies, to all of the countries across Europe.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s